Thursday, July 29, 2010

The Question is Whether Gods Die?

This is a quick poll of sorts. I have been pontificating over a few ideas of deity, as I do on occasion, and I want to get your feedback as I write my next article on the subject.

Here's the gist: Do the gods die? Are the gods born? Do they have a finite amount of time to reign? These kinds of questions might help to rationalize and bring together ideas of dualism, polytheism, and pantheism. Or, at least, they might in my head.

Without going too deep into my logic, so as not to sway your responses, let me know what you think! Are the gods of history basically deified kings and queens that reigned for a time and then went away? Or, do they change their faces and identities to keep up with the times? Are they eternal and immortal or fixed and have a fate of their own.

Comment, tweet, or - preferably - email your responses to IncitingARiotPodcast@gmail.com!

Love and Lyte,

Fire Lyte

6 comments:

  1. Though I've already sent you an email I found a way of best describing what I meant.
    A God, or as a matter of fact, anything, is forgotten and no trace of it is left or remembered. Then, and only then, has it truly died.

    I know that's only part of your question answered but I answered the other bit in the email :D

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  2. Have you ever read the book American Gods by Neil Gaiman? Gods can only die when they are forgotten (as Aria has already said) by the people who worship/make homage to them. Their image can change/morph as other cultures grab onto them. I highly doubt that my image of Cernunnos is the same as an Ancient Celt. However, the fact that I honor the Horned God keeps him alive.

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  3. "Death" is not the end. In several cases, Gods die all the time. In fact, their deaths are the axis that their mythos revolves around. Just take a leisurely stroll through any small town in the South waving a Pride flag. You'll be reminded... sometimes not so politely... that "Jesus Christ died for your Sins!" The "Dying God" is an archetypal image that is woven into the very fabric of the collective unconscious.

    And I disagree that Gods, even when forgotten and all evidence of their Being is effaced from the world, just poof out of existence. Some things are older than Human memory and experience. I also believe in the First Law of Thermodynamics: Energy cannot be created or destroyed, it can only be transformed.

    As we've been shown again and again throughout human history, archetypal deities have been reborn countless times in different incarnations. Usually, it's the same rose... just a different name.

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  4. I think that true, eternal death of a god can't take place until that god is forgotten. However, minor, temporal death (Jesus's crucifixion, Baldur's Death-By-Twig, etc.) can and does happen as part of the mythos. "I died, but I got better" sort of a thing.

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  5. Here is my answer. I don't honestly know if they are dead or alive. I think they are right in the between. If they were dead then how would they come back, if they were alive how would they die? The come and help us when we ask for it, so they simply are not dead. They are simply not alive either because they answer our questions and demands when we need to see them.

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  6. Quick question, who is the artist of the image you put up? Did you make it? If not, could you link to the artist's page, or more work? Thanks!

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