Sunday, August 7, 2011

So... This happened yesterday.

Rick Perry, the delightful man running the state of Texas as its governor, spent yesterday leading 30,000 people in prayer. The rally, called The Response, was touted by Perry as a time to pray for the country, because he doesn't have any answers to the rising job, economic, debt, (etc.) crises...so let's ask god.

He called it a non-denominational event open to all...you know...except you have to pray to the Christian god, and it's being led by about a half dozen of the most racist, bigoted zealots this nation has ever birthed. There's the guy who says Japan's economy is failing because the president had sex with a demon. The guy who said Oprah is a sign of the antiChrist. The guy who said that the Christian god sent the Nazis to kill all the Jews. And, of course, all of them hate the gays and can't wait to roast marshmallows on their burning corpses when they get to Hell. (Of course, if they can help them get down there faster, all the better.)


Some excerpts from his prayer(s) have been making the rounds in the news:

“Father, our heart breaks for America,” Perry said as he led the crowd in prayer. "We see fear in the marketplace. We see anger in the halls of government and as a nation, we have forgotten who made us, who protects us, blesses us, and that we cry out for your forgiveness.”

“Our hearts do break for those who suffer, those afflicted by the loss of loved ones, the pain of addiction, the strife that they may find at home – those who have lost jobs, who have lost their homes, people who have lost hope."

“Loving God, forgive us our many sins: for being judgmental, unloving, focused on ourselves, lacking in mercy, hypocritical,” he said. “We are sinful and flawed; use us anyway, by and for your glory and purposes that we may all live quiet and peaceful lives. We need you. America needs you. I pray this in your name.”

While I appreciate the idea of calling the nation to pray for our country, I don't like the way he is going about this. Nor do I like the manner in which he has pretty much said, "Well, I don't really have any good ideas for fixing the country. How about we pray!" And...that's nice...but it doesn't fix anything. It makes evangelical Christians feel better, and to them this is doing something. But, for those of us a little more practical, or simply not Christian, I cannot see this as anything other than pseudo-political posturing.

This reminds me of when George W. Bush won the 2004 elections and said that he now had a mandate from God. Yep, that worked out.

Rick Perry's ideas are not the kind we need in Washington. Has Obama done a 100% job of making everyone happy? No. Could anybody? Absolutely not. But, at least we're not under a theocratic form of Christianized government following the reckless mentality of saying "damned the laws, I'm doing things however I want." We have a separation of church and state in this country, and I cannot in any way see how this does not violate that separation. If you want to be a politician, then recognize that you are not a Christian preacher. And vice versa.

What do YOU think about The Response?

Update! The full video of the longest continuously serving U.S. Governor, three-term Texas politician (who likes to just ignore things like the Vienna Convention when it suits him) giving a Christian sermon is below for your viewing pleasure.

Love and Lyte,

Fire Lyte

8 comments:

  1. I have thought and thought and thought over this since I first started reading articles about it and about the whole DC40 thing(supported by the same lovely people who supported this thing too I believe).

    If it was just a bunch of Christians gathering together to pray the country finds its way to Jesus, it wouldn't bother me. If it was organized by some big name preacher it wouldn't bother me. But having this hosted by an elected official? That's disturbing and I sure as hell hope no Texas tax dollars went to sponsor this thing and that Perry and pals bankrolled this themselves.

    As far as their prayers go, I am not overly concerned with that. They can pray for ideas, pray for divine intervention (though that is lazy as you pointed out) and pray everyone believes the way they do until their knees have thicker callouses than a $10 hooker. But this does seem to call for increased vigilance on the part of those of us who would not like to see the United States become a theocracy. Vigilance in the form of being politically aware whats going on in our own communities. Are our local politicians getting in bed with these guys? If so write, protest, so whatever it takes to let them know this is NOT what we want. And hell a few nicely phrased prayers and rituals on our part wouldn't hurt too - but it needs to be coupled with political awareness and the will to follow through.

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  2. I'm SO happy to be Canadian. You guys in the U.S. are so widely divided on every major issue. The conservative Christians scare me to my core. It seems like a very frightening time to be an American. This reminds me of an interesting scene in the film "Religulous" when Bill Maher says something like "Conservative Christians think the end of the world is coming and they'll be going to Heaven. So why would they do anything to make the world better?" I'm just sorry the kind, loving Christians are often lumped in with the crazies. As a Canadian Witch, all I can do is pray and keep up with my country's foreign policy... I think I'll donate to some American charities though...

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  3. T. Divine Wind TsutaruAugust 7, 2011 at 12:08 PM

    This is my opinion, and I know it's probably repetitive and perhaps even scarier than anything else discussed here:

    The United States of America is at a point to where it will take someone with the powers of a dictator to straighten everything out. (This is, of course, if the United States were to remain a single nation, and not become divided in a similar manner when the Confederacy split pre-civil war.) And, if this happens, we will likely be ruled by a single person who is either a right-wing fascist (like Hitler or Mussolini) or a left-wing communist/socialist (like Mao, Lenin, or Marx). I don't think a centerist dictatorship would be effective enough.

    Adversely, if the United States were to divide, in what way would they do so? Would each of the 50 states become independent republics? Would some states stay together and form micro-unions? Would the states themselves even remain whole, or would they split like South California (among others) want to?

    This is, indeed, a scary time in America. If I had connections in Canada I'd be wanting to migrate there. (With no offence intended toward Canadians;) While I hate their sugary ketchup and their hamburgers which are NOT made of real beef (but love Tim Horton's coffee!!), their government is more stable and their scenery more beautiful.

    That's this Oklahoma-based truck driver's opinion, for whatever it may be worth.

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  4. I have to agree completely with your thoughts here. I am thankful for leaving my home state (Texas) and moving to Denmark. Words cannot describe the level of frustration I have with the all levels of the government. Instead of working together for the people they represent, they are pointing fingers and blaming one another. Greed is their priority, whether it be power, money, or whetever. They need to get their heads out of their asses and reasses their priorities. They've got a huge responsibility to the American people, but are failing to do what needs to be done. I'm just disgusted by it all.

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  5. This whole thing reminds me that in other countries, especially the Middle East countries... [where they fight for democracy while living in conditions that the average American could never imagine] ... They are questioning the right of having Islamic law enforced in their govt or having a secular govt, and those leaders at least are DOING something, even if it's just listening to what the people want. They shed blood to kick a dictator out and instill a better form of govt.

    What CAN Americans do, what can our govt do for us? I have no idea except apparently it's acceptable for us to have religious politicians... despite the fact that I, personally, do not like how they vote on key issues! Do people even research these candidates thoroughly during election year, or do they get suckered in with all the mud-flinging and just take what comes? Where are the real leaders?

    Sorry, I tend to ramble without making much sense, so if I don't come across clearly, let me know. And I'll do my best, again. :)

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  6. FireLyte: I came across this article (http://ordinary-gentlemen.com/blog/2011/08/08/rick-perrys-christian-america/#more-25329) about Mr. Perry and today's Jeso-centric political language, and thought you might also find it thought-provoking. I was particularly interested in the broad and generic religious language cited from early American history, but I wish we had gone the way of greater breadth/inclusion rather than divisive specifics.

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  7. Given that early press on the "Response" event declared that there was no way that they would allow any non-Christians to attend at all, how multi-cultural could they be?

    What this event mostly shows to me, is that the "right-wing conspiracy to overthrow the U.S. Government" is not so very well hidden, and that the nation's law-enforcement types are just letting these wanna-be Rulers Over Christian America (for which they'll happily assassinate each other to become, once the non-Protestants have been gotten rid of) build up their forces, work on the training of their illegal private armies, and assemble ever-growing stockpiles of munitions and explosives.

    Do you ever get the feeling that should something like the current London Riots happen here in the States, that the right-wingers might just decide that to be their best opportunity to send out their militias, their Blackwaater (whatever the new name is) shock troops to capture vivtal points of our government (like killing the Democratic and Independent and what they call RINO memebers of Congress), as well as all of the Thug forces they have been indoctrinating for years in those privately (Evangelical) owned prisons around the country.

    As ever, use my comments if you choose.

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  8. Frankly this guy gives me the willies. If I belived in it at all, I would think he was the Antichrist.

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